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Chocolate Monkey, 5341 Sunset Boulevard Suite C: 29 July 2018   no comments

Posted at 11:37 pm in closing

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Although I did not know it, Chocolate Monkey is a small family owned chain of candy shops. As their Facebook explains, the owners have moved to Tennessee to run the stores there, and keeping up with the lone South Carolina store from there was just a bridge too far.

That's a good looking strawberry!

(Hat tip to commenter James R)

Written by ted on August 28th, 2018

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Tic Toc Candy Shoppe, 5175 Sunset Boulevard Suite 10: June 2016   no comments

Posted at 11:51 pm in closing

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Commenter James R. reports that this little candy storefront in Hope Ferry Center closed on 30 June 2016 with the retirement of the owners. By the time I finally remembered to get over there, I found that the space is already open again, this time as The Classy Cruet a fancy olive oil and vinegar emporium.

(Hat tip to commenter James R)

Written by ted on September 26th, 2016

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Jeff Hunt Machinery Company / The Crane Company / Columbia Cigar and Candy Company, 522 Lady Street: 1997   no comments

Posted at 1:58 am in closing

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These pictures are from 30 November 2014, so the site has probably changed a good bit by now, but that was when I noticed these nice old brick buildings on Lady Street adjacent to Trustus were being gutted for renovation.

Here is what the City has to say about the project:

February 2014
DESIGN/DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMISSION
DESIGN REVIEW DISTRICT
EVALUATION SHEET
Case # 6

ADDRESS:
522 Lady Street

APPLICANT:
Scott Lambert, architect/agent

TAX MAP REFERENCE: TMS# 08912-05-01

USE OF PROPERTY:
Commercial

REVIEW DISTRICT:
W. Gervais Historic Commercial District/City Center

NATURE OF REQUEST: Request Certificate of Design Approval for exterior
changes and preliminary certification for the Bailey Bill

FINDINGS/COMMENTS:

Very typical of the warehouse district in which it was built, this is a
simple one-story brick building used for warehouse and office purposes
over the years. It has been heavily altered during this time, with
original window openings bricked in and concrete block additions at the
front of the building on Huger Street and a later small brick addition
at the rear of the building. There are no original windows or doors
intact. Still, it is reminiscent of the architecture and original uses
of buildings in the historic district and is one of the few extant
buildings from the time period along Huger Street.

This was originally built in 1926; its original occupant was the Jeff
Hunt Machinery Company which maintained a business at this address for
30 years. The Crane Company followed for a brief period but the
Columbia Cigar and Candy Company acquired the building by 1965 and kept
its business there until 1997.

The plans are to rehabilitate the building for office use,
re-establishing some of the original openings and removing less
sensitive additions from the building. Additionally, a new entry is
proposed on the Lady Street side. As all four sides of this building
are visible from a public right of way, each elevation is discussed and
reviewed below

Here and here is a bit from the architect.

And here is a bit from the construction company.

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Written by ted on February 27th, 2015

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Candy Boquet, 109-W Old Chapin Road: August 2013   no comments

Posted at 5:22 pm in Uncategorized

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The Lexington franchaise of Candy Boquet was in this theater-themed storefront in the Flight Deck complex at the corner of Old Chapin Road and US-1. Just looking at the national webside makes me think of Edible Arrangements somewhat, though with the bonus that you don't have to eat your boquet before it goes bad.

I wonder what this storefront was originally? Perhaps a video rental store? Looking at the marquee in full resolution, you can see that there are words behind the current Or Lease text, but I can't really make it out.

Just as a side note, driving this section of US-1 is purely miserable in Lexington at this time. Just past The Flight Deck there is a bad section of roadwork exacerbated by unsyncronized lights.

(Hat tip to commenter James)

Written by ted on August 29th, 2013

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Palmetto Candy & Tobacco, 1225 Lincoln Street: March 2012   8 comments

Posted at 3:12 am in Uncategorized

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Commenter Larry points out this State story on the closing of Palmetto Candy & Tobacco. This Columbia institution is on Lincoln Street across from the Seaboard station, and is someplace I have always meant to check out. In the event, as is often the case, I have apparently waited too long.

As the 21 April story (which places the closing time as "about a month ago") notes, there is a "remodeling" sign on the store door, but I find that more often than not in these cases, that is kind of a "the cat is on the roof and won't come down" way to break bad news. This is especially the case given the customer base was apparently largely "filling stations, corner markets, baseball leagues and swimming pools" -- the types of operations which will quickly change to new suppliers and then be reluctant to make yet another change if the place reopens.

(Hat tip to commener Larry)

Written by ted on April 23rd, 2012

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Dry Goods Store / The Flanigan-Clement Candy Company / Paul D. Sloan Interiors (moved), 927 Gervais Street: late 2000s (etc)   2 comments

Posted at 12:11 am in Uncategorized

I noticed on my Vista stroll a few weeks ago that part of the Mais Oui building on the north side of Gervais was vacant. Apparently the last occupant, Paul D. Sloan Interiors relocated down the hill a little ways. The building is quite nice, and I found this information in a 1983 application to the National Park Service for entry in the National Register of Historic Places:

54. 927 Gervais Street. This two-story brick building was constructed ca. 1911 as a dry goods wholesale store. The first story has four brick pilasters with granite bases and capitals framing a central entrance and its flanking display areas. The second story has three paired one-over-one sash windows with granite sills and alternating granite and brickwork surrounds. A projecting metal cornice with brackets is located above the second-story windows. A stepped parapet with granite coping and a central brick balustrade is at the roofline. An original second story balcony, a first-floor cornice, and the original first-floor doors and windows have been removed and new doors and windows installed between the brick pilasters. The interior of the building has also been remodeled.

An interesting, if frustrating, story from The Columbia Star (apparently based on old reports from The Columbia Record) gives the candy store information, and this bit of excitement:

About 8 am, on July 23, 1921, John R. Martin departed his home at 1420 Calhoun Street. He was driving an Essex roadster owned by the Flanigan-Clement Candy Company, a local wholesale firm, whose emblem was painted on the right door. As the company’s primary traveling salesman, he made some deliveries to various local customers. Around 3:30 pm, having completed his itinerary, Martin was returning to Columbia along a rural roadway in Lexington County. He was heading back to the main store at 927 Gervais Street. The salesman did not realize that he was about to have a thrilling experience to tell upon reaching his destination.

He was approximately two miles from Broad River Road when he noticed a Ford touring car straddling the road. Martin recalled encountering this vehicle ten minutes earlier at a crossroads. Apparently, there were no dwellings along this isolated stretch of roadway. Two white soldiers, in full uniform, were standing in front of the automobile. With their hands they were beckoning him to stop. A third trooper suddenly emerged from some nearby foliage brandishing a Winchester rifle. His two companions also had drawn .45 caliber Colt revolvers.

Who knew the candy business was so dangerous?

Written by ted on March 19th, 2010

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